Past Years Movies

2013 - 2014 Dudley House Classic Movies 

Fred Astaire Birthday Festival: Pygmalion, Partners, and Petrov

 

Friday, May 9, 12 noon – 10 p.m.

 

Graduate Student Lounge, Dudley House


Our annual day and night celebration of Fred Astaire’s Birthday (he was born May 10, 1899 and would be 115 this year!) will be held this year at Dudley House on the day before his birthday, Friday, May 9, 2014. From 12 noon to 10 p.m. the Timeless Mr. Astaire will weave his spell with two of his favorite partners, Ginger Rogers and Cyd Charisse.  This year’s movies bring us hints of Russia, Svengali, and Pygmalion, danced to the music of the Gershwins, Cole Porter, Harry Warren, and Jerome Kern. 

 

 

 

Come in anytime during the day or evening to participate in the joy which this great American entertainer has brought to the world. Films will be shown on the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge. Everyone is welcome to join us. Refreshments served … have a Ginger Float, sip Fred Water, enjoy birthday cake, and other treats.

12 noon. Introduction to Fred Astaire 

12:15 p.m. The Barkleys of Broadway (1949, 109 min.) From the Era of Great MGM musicals. This is the last film Fred and Ginger made together, after a 10 year separation.  They play a married couple, musical entertainers on Broadway who have a crisis in their marriage and careers. Wonderful script by Comden and Green, music by Harry Warren and Ira Gershwin.

 

 

 

2:15 p.m. Silk Stockings (1957, 117 min.) A musical version of the classic film Ninotchka. Soviet politics and rigidity are no match for Paris and Fred Astaire.

 

Cyd Charisse is a great partner.  Wonderful music by Cole Porter.

 

 

 

Birthday Cake and Coffee will be served after the film.

 

 

 

5 p.m. Short Documentary about Astaire and Rogers

 

 

 

6 p.m.  Roberta (1935, 106 min.)  Paris continues to charm the Russians. Fred meets old friend Ginger and love follows. Fashion shows, fabulous dance numbers, and beautiful music by Jerome Kern are highlights.

 

 

7:45 p.m.  Shall We Dance (1937, 109 min.) Fred is Petrov, a dancer with the Russian ballet who really wants to be a hoofer and marry Ginger!  Great music by George and Ira Gershwin

 

Shakespeare’s Birthday Film Night: Fun at the Globe Theatre!

Wednesday, April 23

 

Help us to celebrate the 450th birthday of The Bard of Avon (April 23, 1564) by watching two wonderful productions actually filmed at the Shakespeare Globe Theatre in London!  Shown on the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge

  • At 6 p.m.  Doctor Who:  The Shakespeare Code  (45 min.)

It’s 1599 and Stratford’s Favorite Playwright is having trouble with “Love’s Labour’s Won.” Learn why, and see how he and the Doctor help each other with lines, flirting tips, etc. Some of the scenes were filmed live at The Globe in London.

  • At 7 p.m. Shakespeare Globe Production of Much Ado About Nothing (2012)

 Eve Best and Charles Edwards star in this energetic, interactive, and invigorating production of Shakespeare’s famous comedy.  This is a filmed version of a live performance at the Globe Theatre and gives a wonderful example of why seeing a Shakespeare play in that setting is unlike anything else.  Wonderful ensemble acting makes this a treat to watch.

 

 

Films, laughter, birthday cake and ice cream and other treats.  Everyone invited!

Royal Visits at Dudley in September
Friday, September 13, 6:30 p.m.  The King’s Speech (2010)
The last King George in England (George VI) inspires the new Royal Baby George and the rest of us with his acceptance of duty and his courageous work with a speech therapist to conquer his stammer.  Working with a wonderful screenplay, Academy Award Winners Colin Firth (The King) and Geoffrey Rush (The Therapist) give powerful performances.  (119 min.)


Friday, September 20, 6:30 p.m. The Princess Bride (1987)
Inconceivable! As You Wish! My name is Inigo Montoya…yes, all the classic lines, a visit to the fire swamp, screaming eels, dastardly villains, and (sigh) Dread Pirate Roberts and Buttercup…what a great movie! (98 min.)

 

Buster Keaton Birthday Evening, Friday, October 4
Help us to celebrate this great genius of cinema on his 118th enjoying two of his greatest films.  Silent Comedy Classics (with musical accompaniment included). 

6:00 p.m.  One Week (1920)  (22 min.) 
One of the greatest of Buster Keaton’s short films. Newlyweds are gifted with a do-it-yourself house kit…surrealistic chaos ensues.

6:30 p.m. Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928)  (75 min.)
Buster braves a hurricane to regain his dad’s love.  Moments of high comedy and sheer daring will dazzle you.                                    
 

Hitchcock Suspense

Friday, October 11, 6:30 p.m. THE LADY VANISHES (1938)

One of Hitchcock’s most enjoyable films. Spies, trains, espionage, humor, and suspense…this film has it all! (96 min.)

 

Spooky Classics

Thursday, October 31

9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Outside of the 3rd Floor Office we’ll be running Universal Studio Classics from the 1930s….The Mummy, Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolfman … all day. Come up and relax with the great monsters of the past, munch on candy, and prepare for Halloween.

  

Doctor Who: Preparing for Regeneration … Again

Friday, November 15

This month marks the 50th Anniversary of the beginning of the classic UK series, Doctor Who (November 23, 1963). To celebrate we will watch an episode in which the soon-to-be 12th Doctor, Peter Capaldi, has a leading role and then watch the wonderful episodes when the 10th Doctor “almost” regenerates! Fun for Whovians and non Whovians alike!

6 p.m.The Fires of Pompeii David Tennant, Catherine Tate, and Peter Capaldi face the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 A.D. (45 min.)

7 p.m.Stolen Earth/Journey’s End. This episode is full of exciting moments…the possible end of the universe, Daleks, and lots of goodbyes. The 10th Doctor (David Tennant) and many companions save us all once more. (90 min.)

 

Holiday Film Evening

Friday, December 6, 6 p.m. The Sound of Music(1965). Crisp apple strudel, Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp, nuns, nazis, alps, a scheming baroness…and all those children! Irresistible for so many of us…we can’t help it. Great fun for everyone! (174 min.)

 

  

 

 

Fred Astaire Birthday Festival: Steps in Time 

Friday, May 10, 12 noon – 10 p.m.

Graduate Student Lounge, Dudley House

Our annual day and night celebration of Fred Astaire’s Birthday (he was born May 10, 1899 and would be 114 this year!) will be held this year at Dudley House on his birthday, Friday, May 10, 2013. From 12 noon to 10 p.m. the Timeless Mr. Astaire will dance us backwards in time … from 1981, through 1953, 1948, 1942, all the way back to 1933… as we enjoy together some of his most wonderful films! 

Come in anytime during the day or evening to participate in the joy which this great American entertainer has brought to the world. Films will be shown on the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge. Everyone is welcome to join us. Refreshments served … have a Ginger Float, sip Fred Water, enjoy birthday cake, and other treats.

12 noon. Introduction to Fred Astaire 

12:15 p.m. In 1981 The American Film Institute honored Fred with its Life Achievement Award at a televised banquet.  This is a magnificent introduction to the life and work of this great American dancer. Tributes are offered by such stars as David Niven, Audrey Hepburn, Mikhail Barishnikov, Cyd Charisse, Gene Kelly, and Jimmy Cagney.  And clips of some of his greatest film performances are shown. A real treat!

2 p.m. The Bandwagon (1953, 112 min.) From the Era of Great MGM musicals. A glimpse into the backstage traumas of putting on a stage musical. This is often mentioned as one of the greatest film musicals of all times. Funny, satirical, and moving, with terrific numbers.

Birthday Cake and Coffee will be served after the film.

4:15 p.m. Easter Parade (1948, 103 min.) The only film Fred made with Judy Garland and they make a marvelous team. Set in the New York of 1912, this endearing movie is full of special moments.

6 p.m.  Holiday Inn (1942, 100 min.)  Fred is joined by Bing Crosby in this Irving Berlin musical.  Fred’s Firecracker Dance makes you long for the Fourth of July, and Bing introduces “White Christmas” to the world.

7:45 p.m.  Flying Down to Rio (1933, 89 min.) We end our journey back in time, enjoying this madly entertaining film that first paired Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

 

 

Friday April 26.  Shakespeare’s Birthday Film Night

 

Help us to celebrate the recent  birthday of The Bard of Avon (last Tuesday, April 23) by watching a classic performance of one his greatest plays, Macbeth.  This version stars Ian McKellan and Judy Dench (before they were Sir Ian and Dame Judy!).  6:30 p.m. in the Graduate Student Lounge.

 

Remember to save Friday, May 10, from noon to 10 p.m. for our annual Fred Astaire Festival!!

 

 

 

Friday, April 5  Doctor Who: The Angels Have the Phone Box

Join us for another of our Doctor Who evenings in the Graduate Student Lounge at 6 p.m.

Problems that haunt the 11th Doctor were introduced to us during the time of the 10th Doctor.
We’ll enjoy together the episodes BLINK and THE SILENCE IN THE LIBRARY.  David Tennant plays The Doctor.  Daleks, Weeping Angels, and the Vashta Nerada are not invited. River Song will definitely be there. Come if you’re a fan….come if you’ve never seen Doctor Who…it will be fun…and scary!

 

Fabulous Fellows February Film Festival

 

Defiance (2008).  Defiance is a compelling World War II drama based on the true story of four Jewish brothers who escape into the Belarussian forests in Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe, where they take on the responsibility of protecting over a thousand Polish Jews fleeing the Nazi war machine.  The Bielski brothers work to create a functioning community with their fellow refugees and ally themselves with Russian resistance fighters against Nazi forces.  In addition to the ever-present threat of a Nazi attack, an approaching bitterly harsh winter and sibling infighting threaten the group's survival. Starring Daniel Craig, Liev Schreiber, and Jamie Bell. Friday, February 1,  6:30 p.m.  137 min. (Beth Smoot)

Groundhog Day (1993).  Bill Murray’s life becomes stuck one Groundhog Day and it’s a joy to see if or how he gets out of it!  Saturday, February 2, 7 p.m. (Beth Smoot) 

The Lives of Others (2006). In 1980s Berlin, a Stasi officer finds that the more he listens, the more he cares. A powerful film about betrayal and its consequences. Tuesday, February 5, 7 p.m.  137 min. (Donal Cahill) 

Everything is Illuminated (2005). This movie is a hilarious comedy as well as a serious drama, and both the humor and the themes are dark. It tells the story of an eccentric Jewish man who embarks on an adventure in search of the story behind his grandfather's tragic past in a remote Ukrainian village. The story and cinematography make the film feel like you're in a dream, where incredible things happen but you believe them as they're happening. The characters are vividly unique and multidimensional, and the portrayal of the Eastern European family is hilariously, brutally honest. The film is based on the book by Jonathan Safran Foer, and stars Elijah Wood and Eugene Hutz (from the band Gogol Bordello, who also supply the soundtrack. Thursday, February 7, 8 p.m.  106 min.  (Anna Leshinskaya)

Can’t Miss Double Feature:  Troll 2 (1990)  Best Worst Movie (2009). There are no trolls in Troll 2Troll 2 isn’t even a legitimate sequel to Troll 1; it’s an amateur attempt at exploiting a franchise by a delusional Italian director who hired mostly non-actor locals (who he refers to as his “dogs”) for his “masterpiece.” The result is a magnificent and hilarious train-wreck of a film that over the course of a few decades has gained the boastful reputation as being the best bad movie of all time. How bad is this film? Bad enough to earn a whopping 0% on Rotten Tomatoes, bad enough to get 2.5 stars on IMDB, and most of all bad enough to inspire an award-winning documentary film entitled, “Best Worst Movie” (ironically scoring a 94% on RT). We’ll be screening Troll 2 and then Best Worst Movie shortly after, a kind of “where are they now” with the cast and crew as they deal with their new popularity as cult figures. Don’t miss your chance to see the “Plan 9” of our generation!  Troll 2 themed drinks and snacks will be provided.   Friday, February 8, 6:00 p.m.  95 and 93 min.  (Jeff Chenette)

Kate and Leopold (2001).  Treat yourself to a pre-Valentine’s day romance starring Hugh Jackman as a 19th century nobleman suddenly transported to 21st century Manhattan where he falls in love with Meg Ryan and they try to figure out how to make the time difference work for them.  Wednesday, February 13, 6:30 p.m.  118 min.  (Susan Zawalich)

Black Narcissus (1947) A Classic of British Cinema from director Michael Powell.  A group of nuns is given a “House of Women” to use as a convent in the Himalayas.  Gradually their discipline is undermined by the eroticism and exoticism of the surroundings.  Great crashing melodrama drenched in Technicolor.  A Truly Amazing Film.  Friday, February 15, 6:30 p.m. 100 min. (Susan Zawalich)

Memento (2000) Intriguing story of an amnesiac trying desperately to remember what happened to him.  Directed by Christopher Nolan, before Batman!  Tuesday, February 19, 7 p.m.  113 min. (Gregory Malecha)

Je ne suis pas là pour être aimé” (Not Here to Be Loved”)  (2005) A charming French love story about a lonely middle-aged man who enrolls in a dance class, meets a special someone, and then complications and romance follow.  Friday, February 22, 7 p.m.  93 min.  (Tom Wisniewski)

 

 

 

 

Europe in January at Dudley House

For those us remaining in Cambridge this month here are two opportunities to escape through film to Rome and Paris with marvelous scenery, talented actors, and wonderful stories.  Please join us during January@GSAS  in the Graduate Student Lounge where we will watch these classics on the big-screen TV and dream of our own European adventures.

 

Wednesday, January 16, 6:30 p.m.  Roman Holiday (1953)

Audrey Hepburn won the Oscar in her first starring role in this captivating film.  She plays a princess who escapes from her duties for a short “holiday” in Rome….there she meets Gregory Peck, a reporter in search of a story….who, instead, loses his heart.  Wonderful scenes shot in Rome, a scintillating script, and charming performances make this an all-time favorite.

 

Friday, January 18m 6:30 p.m.  Midnight in Paris (2011)

Woody Allen’s rueful comedy about a writer visiting Paris who longs for the stimulation of an earlier era…through some magical passage he gets his wish to meet Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, and other inhabitants of ex-pat Paris in the 20s.  Owen Wilson leads the cast.

 

 

Olympics 1924

Friday, September 14, 6:30 p.m. Chariots of Fire (1981)
We all have a bit of “Olympics withdrawal” this month, so please
come and join us at Dudley to watch this classic story of two
skilled British track athletes who strive to compete in the 1924
Games in Paris. The film features strong character development,
historical settings, sportsmanship, struggles with class structure,
and an unforgettable music score that will make you want to run
right out of the Graduate Student Lounge when it is finished!
(124 min.)

 

A Great American Musical

Friday, September 21, 6:30 p.m. Singin’ in the Rain (1952)
The year is 1927 and a major star of the silent cinema is in crisis
when sound movies begin. No, it’s not last year’s Academy
Award-winning film, The Artist, it’s a magnificent Technicolor
musical starring Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, and Donald
O’Connor. This film is considered to be one of the greatest film
musicals ever made and it is tremendous fun. “Come on with the
rain, I’ve a smile on my face.” (103 min.)

 

Sight and Sound’s Greatest Film: #1

Friday, October 5, 6:30 p.m. Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo (1958)
Voted the greatest film of all time by Sight and Sound this year,
this film about obsession, deception, manipulation and domination
is one of Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpieces. James Stewart and
Kim Novak are the stars (128 min.)

 

Sight and Sound’s Greatest Film: #2

Friday, October 19, 6:30 p.m. OrsonWelles’ Citizen Kane (1941)
Still considered to be the most influential film ever made, it was
knocked off its 50-year #1 status this year by Vertigo. See what
you think. Orson Welles’ masterpiece about a rich newspaper
baron and his difficulties with relationships is an exhilarating trip
through the wonders of cinema. (119 min.)

 

Spooky Classics

Wednesday, October 31, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 
Outside of the 3rd Floor Office we’ll be running Universal
Studio Classics from the 1930s….The MummyDracula,
FrankensteinThe Wolfman … all day. Come up and relax with
the great monsters of the past and prepare for Halloween.

 

Hitchcock Suspense

Friday, November 9, 6:30 p.m. Rear Window (1954)
Hitchcock’s wonderfully entertaining story of voyeurism, murder, fashion,
and fun. James Stewart and Grace Kelly are the marvelous stars of this
suspense classic. (112 min.)

 

Holiday Film Evening

Friday, December 7, 6 p.m. The Sound of Music (1965).
Crisp apple strudel, Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp, nuns, nazis, alps,
a scheming baroness…and all those children! Irresistible for so many of
us…we can’t help it. Great fun for everyone! (174 min.)

2012 - 2013 Dudley House Classic Movies 

Fred Astaire Birthday Festival: Steps in Time 

Friday, May 10, 12 noon – 10 p.m.

Graduate Student Lounge, Dudley House

Our annual day and night celebration of Fred Astaire’s Birthday (he was born May 10, 1899 and would be 114 this year!) will be held this year at Dudley House on his birthday, Friday, May 10, 2013. From 12 noon to 10 p.m. the Timeless Mr. Astaire will dance us backwards in time … from 1981, through 1953, 1948, 1942, all the way back to 1933… as we enjoy together some of his most wonderful films! 

Come in anytime during the day or evening to participate in the joy which this great American entertainer has brought to the world. Films will be shown on the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge. Everyone is welcome to join us. Refreshments served … have a Ginger Float, sip Fred Water, enjoy birthday cake, and other treats.

12 noon. Introduction to Fred Astaire 

12:15 p.m. In 1981 The American Film Institute honored Fred with its Life Achievement Award at a televised banquet.  This is a magnificent introduction to the life and work of this great American dancer. Tributes are offered by such stars as David Niven, Audrey Hepburn, Mikhail Barishnikov, Cyd Charisse, Gene Kelly, and Jimmy Cagney.  And clips of some of his greatest film performances are shown. A real treat!

2 p.m. The Bandwagon (1953, 112 min.) From the Era of Great MGM musicals. A glimpse into the backstage traumas of putting on a stage musical. This is often mentioned as one of the greatest film musicals of all times. Funny, satirical, and moving, with terrific numbers.

Birthday Cake and Coffee will be served after the film.

4:15 p.m. Easter Parade (1948, 103 min.) The only film Fred made with Judy Garland and they make a marvelous team. Set in the New York of 1912, this endearing movie is full of special moments.

6 p.m.  Holiday Inn (1942, 100 min.)  Fred is joined by Bing Crosby in this Irving Berlin musical.  Fred’s Firecracker Dance makes you long for the Fourth of July, and Bing introduces “White Christmas” to the world.

7:45 p.m.  Flying Down to Rio (1933, 89 min.) We end our journey back in time, enjoying this madly entertaining film that first paired Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

 

 

Friday April 26.  Shakespeare’s Birthday Film Night

 

Help us to celebrate the recent  birthday of The Bard of Avon (last Tuesday, April 23) by watching a classic performance of one his greatest plays, Macbeth.  This version stars Ian McKellan and Judy Dench (before they were Sir Ian and Dame Judy!).  6:30 p.m. in the Graduate Student Lounge.

 

Remember to save Friday, May 10, from noon to 10 p.m. for our annual Fred Astaire Festival!!

 

 

Friday, April 5  Doctor Who: The Angels Have the Phone Box

Join us for another of our Doctor Who evenings in the Graduate Student Lounge at 6 p.m.

Problems that haunt the 11th Doctor were introduced to us during the time of the 10th Doctor.
We’ll enjoy together the episodes BLINK and THE SILENCE IN THE LIBRARY.  David Tennant plays The Doctor.  Daleks, Weeping Angels, and the Vashta Nerada are not invited. River Song will definitely be there. Come if you’re a fan….come if you’ve never seen Doctor Who…it will be fun…and scary!

 

Fabulous Fellows February Film Festival

 

Defiance (2008).  Defiance is a compelling World War II drama based on the true story of four Jewish brothers who escape into the Belarussian forests in Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe, where they take on the responsibility of protecting over a thousand Polish Jews fleeing the Nazi war machine.  The Bielski brothers work to create a functioning community with their fellow refugees and ally themselves with Russian resistance fighters against Nazi forces.  In addition to the ever-present threat of a Nazi attack, an approaching bitterly harsh winter and sibling infighting threaten the group's survival. Starring Daniel Craig, Liev Schreiber, and Jamie Bell. Friday, February 1,  6:30 p.m.  137 min. (Beth Smoot)

Groundhog Day (1993).  Bill Murray’s life becomes stuck one Groundhog Day and it’s a joy to see if or how he gets out of it!  Saturday, February 2, 7 p.m. (Beth Smoot) 

The Lives of Others (2006). In 1980s Berlin, a Stasi officer finds that the more he listens, the more he cares. A powerful film about betrayal and its consequences. Tuesday, February 5, 7 p.m.  137 min. (Donal Cahill) 

Everything is Illuminated (2005). This movie is a hilarious comedy as well as a serious drama, and both the humor and the themes are dark. It tells the story of an eccentric Jewish man who embarks on an adventure in search of the story behind his grandfather's tragic past in a remote Ukrainian village. The story and cinematography make the film feel like you're in a dream, where incredible things happen but you believe them as they're happening. The characters are vividly unique and multidimensional, and the portrayal of the Eastern European family is hilariously, brutally honest. The film is based on the book by Jonathan Safran Foer, and stars Elijah Wood and Eugene Hutz (from the band Gogol Bordello, who also supply the soundtrack. Thursday, February 7, 8 p.m.  106 min.  (Anna Leshinskaya)

Can’t Miss Double Feature:  Troll 2 (1990)  Best Worst Movie (2009). There are no trolls in Troll 2Troll 2 isn’t even a legitimate sequel to Troll 1; it’s an amateur attempt at exploiting a franchise by a delusional Italian director who hired mostly non-actor locals (who he refers to as his “dogs”) for his “masterpiece.” The result is a magnificent and hilarious train-wreck of a film that over the course of a few decades has gained the boastful reputation as being the best bad movie of all time. How bad is this film? Bad enough to earn a whopping 0% on Rotten Tomatoes, bad enough to get 2.5 stars on IMDB, and most of all bad enough to inspire an award-winning documentary film entitled, “Best Worst Movie” (ironically scoring a 94% on RT). We’ll be screening Troll 2 and thenBest Worst Movie shortly after, a kind of “where are they now” with the cast and crew as they deal with their new popularity as cult figures. Don’t miss your chance to see the “Plan 9” of our generation!  Troll 2 themed drinks and snacks will be provided.   Friday, February 8, 6:00 p.m.  95 and 93 min.  (Jeff Chenette)

Kate and Leopold (2001).  Treat yourself to a pre-Valentine’s day romance starring Hugh Jackman as a 19th century nobleman suddenly transported to 21st century Manhattan where he falls in love with Meg Ryan and they try to figure out how to make the time difference work for them.  Wednesday, February 13, 6:30 p.m.  118 min.  (Susan Zawalich)

Black Narcissus (1947) A Classic of British Cinema from director Michael Powell.  A group of nuns is given a “House of Women” to use as a convent in the Himalayas.  Gradually their discipline is undermined by the eroticism and exoticism of the surroundings.  Great crashing melodrama drenched in Technicolor.  A Truly Amazing Film.  Friday, February 15, 6:30 p.m. 100 min. (Susan Zawalich)

Memento (2000) Intriguing story of an amnesiac trying desperately to remember what happened to him.  Directed by Christopher Nolan, before Batman!  Tuesday, February 19, 7 p.m.  113 min. (Gregory Malecha)

Je ne suis pas là pour être aimé” (Not Here to Be Loved”)  (2005) A charming French love story about a lonely middle-aged man who enrolls in a dance class, meets a special someone, and then complications and romance follow.  Friday, February 22, 7 p.m.  93 min.  (Tom Wisniewski)

 

 

 

 

Europe in January at Dudley House

For those us remaining in Cambridge this month here are two opportunities to escape through film to Rome and Paris with marvelous scenery, talented actors, and wonderful stories.  Please join us during January@GSAS  in the Graduate Student Lounge where we will watch these classics on the big-screen TV and dream of our own European adventures.

 

Wednesday, January 16, 6:30 p.m.  Roman Holiday (1953)

Audrey Hepburn won the Oscar in her first starring role in this captivating film.  She plays a princess who escapes from her duties for a short “holiday” in Rome….there she meets Gregory Peck, a reporter in search of a story….who, instead, loses his heart.  Wonderful scenes shot in Rome, a scintillating script, and charming performances make this an all-time favorite.

 

Friday, January 18m 6:30 p.m.  Midnight in Paris (2011)

Woody Allen’s rueful comedy about a writer visiting Paris who longs for the stimulation of an earlier era…through some magical passage he gets his wish to meet Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, and other inhabitants of ex-pat Paris in the 20s.  Owen Wilson leads the cast.

 

 

Olympics 1924

Friday, September 14, 6:30 p.m. Chariots of Fire (1981)
We all have a bit of “Olympics withdrawal” this month, so please
come and join us at Dudley to watch this classic story of two
skilled British track athletes who strive to compete in the 1924
Games in Paris. The film features strong character development,
historical settings, sportsmanship, struggles with class structure,
and an unforgettable music score that will make you want to run
right out of the Graduate Student Lounge when it is finished!
(124 min.)

 

A Great American Musical

Friday, September 21, 6:30 p.m. Singin’ in the Rain (1952)
The year is 1927 and a major star of the silent cinema is in crisis
when sound movies begin. No, it’s not last year’s Academy
Award-winning film, The Artist, it’s a magnificent Technicolor
musical starring Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, and Donald
O’Connor. This film is considered to be one of the greatest film
musicals ever made and it is tremendous fun. “Come on with the
rain, I’ve a smile on my face.” (103 min.)

 

Sight and Sound’s Greatest Film: #1

Friday, October 5, 6:30 p.m. Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo (1958)
Voted the greatest film of all time by Sight and Sound this year,
this film about obsession, deception, manipulation and domination
is one of Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpieces. James Stewart and
Kim Novak are the stars (128 min.)

 

Sight and Sound’s Greatest Film: #2

Friday, October 19, 6:30 p.m. OrsonWelles’ Citizen Kane (1941)
Still considered to be the most influential film ever made, it was
knocked off its 50-year #1 status this year by Vertigo. See what
you think. Orson Welles’ masterpiece about a rich newspaper
baron and his difficulties with relationships is an exhilarating trip
through the wonders of cinema. (119 min.)

 

Spooky Classics

Wednesday, October 31, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 
Outside of the 3rd Floor Office we’ll be running Universal
Studio Classics from the 1930s….The MummyDracula,
FrankensteinThe Wolfman … all day. Come up and relax with
the great monsters of the past and prepare for Halloween.

 

Hitchcock Suspense

Friday, November 9, 6:30 p.m. Rear Window (1954)
Hitchcock’s wonderfully entertaining story of voyeurism, murder, fashion,
and fun. James Stewart and Grace Kelly are the marvelous stars of this
suspense classic. (112 min.)

 

Holiday Film Evening

Friday, December 7, 6 p.m. The Sound of Music (1965).
Crisp apple strudel, Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp, nuns, nazis, alps,
a scheming baroness…and all those children! Irresistible for so many of
us…we can’t help it. Great fun for everyone! (174 min.)

2011 - 2012 Dudley House Classic Movies

Several evenings on the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge – all welcome! We look forward to sharing our favorite films with you at Dudley House. Contact Susan Zawalich (zawalich@fas.harvard.edu) for more information.

Fred Astaire Birthday Festival 2012:  

“Transformations”- May 4, 2012  

Our annual day and night celebration of Fred Astaire’s 113th Birthday (he was born May 10, 1899) will be held on Friday, May 4. This year’s theme of “transformations” will follow through all our films…in addition there will be great dancing, singing, comedy, drama, and partners (Ginger, Audrey, Joan, Irene, Kay, Randolph Scott, Robert Benchley, Walter Brennan) performing music of Gershwin, Berlin, Kern, Mercer, and others). Come in anytime during the day or evening to participate in the joy which this great American entertainer has brought to the world.  Films will be shown and refreshments served in the Graduate Student Lounge. Fred water and Ginger floats will be available during the festival!   All welcome.  

12 noon.  The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle (1939. 93 min.). The last film that Fred and Ginger made in the 1930s, a tribute to two other elegant entertainers who revolutionized social dancing.  A wonderful period piece and a moving finish to the RKO Fred and Ginger series.

 

2 p.m.  The Sky’s the Limit (1943, 89 min). Sometimes described as a “noir musical,” it was filmed during WWII and captures the atmosphere of life at the home front while pilots are on leave from dangerous missions.  Fred teams with Joan Leslie, gives one of his greatest dramatic performances, and performs a breathtaking solo to “One For My Baby and One More For the Road.”  

 

Birthday cake and coffee will be served after the film.

4 p.m. Follow the Fleet (1936, 110 min.).  Fred’s in the navy, Ginger is a dance hall hostess, they were once partners and reconnect again with electric results! Marvelous dancing and wonderful Irving Berlin music make this movie great fun indeed.

6 p.m.  Roberta (1935, 101 minutes).  Fred and Ginger catch up with each other in Paris. Fred’s buddy (Randolph Scott) inherits a fashion house and the clash of tastes begins.  Russian emigrés, Paris fashions, amazing dance numbers, and magical moments create a film that is a very special treat.  

8 p.m.  Funny Face (1957, 103 minutes).  Audrey Hepburn is a Greenwich Village bookworm transformed into a high fashion model by magazine editor Kay Thompson, photographer Fred Astaire, and …Paris! Gershwin music and fabulous Paris settings contribute to the delight.

 

 

 

 

Celebrate Shakespeare's Birthday with us!

His actual birthday is on April 23 but we will celebrate a bit earlier in the Graduate Student Lounge with two wonderful productions starring David Tennant. Shown on the big-screen TV. Everyone welcome!

April 20 – 6 p.m.  THE SHAKESPEARE CODE (2006), 45 min. British Sci-Fi Hero Doctor Who journeys back in time with Martha Jones to 1599 to meet Will Shakespeare -- they inspire each other while stealing each other's best lines...and saving the earth from alien invasion! A great appetizer for the second feature….


April 20  7 p.m.  HAMLET (2009), 183 min. David Tennant (Hamlet), Patrick Stewart (Claudius) and a fabulous ensemble cast from England's Royal Shakespeare Company give dazzling performances in a stunning modern production.

 

"New Earth" and "Doctor Who", Friday, March 2  

 

Join us for a fun-filled journey with The Doctor, the iconic time traveler from the planet Gallifrey, on Friday evening, Mar 2.

Beginning at 6 p.m. we will watch 3 episodes featuring the 9th and 10th Doctors as they take their companions to the future to witness the destruction of the earth and the New New New New…..Earth that is built up in its memory.  Everyone welcome!  Each episode is about 45 minutes long and together they make a wonderful trilogy.  Allons-y

 

The End of the World.  The Doctor (Christopher Eccleston) takes his new companion Rose (Billie Piper) to watch the destruction of Planet Earth far in the future.  They meet many different life forms and thwart evildoers, as always

New Earth.  The Doctor (David Tennant) has regenerated and takes his beloved companion Rose for a trip to visit New New New New New……Earth, a planet civilization begun in memory of the now destroyed Planet Earth.  They meet some old friends and new challenges.

Gridlock.  The Doctor (David Tennant) brings his new companion, Martha Jones (Freema Agyeman), to visit New New New New….Earth…but something dreadful has happened to the planet since his last visit.

 

 

Fabulous Fellows Film Festival at Dudley House 2012

 

Movies will be shown in the Graduate Student Lounge unless otherwise noted. All welcome

Tangled (2010), Wed. Feb. 1 at 8 p.m. (Arts Fellows)

Enjoy this animated Disney classic loosely based on the Grimm’s Fairy Tale Rapunzel.

Groundhog Day(1993), Thurs. Feb. 2 at 7 p.m. (Literary Fellows) 

“Do you ever have déjà vu? Didn’t you just ask me that? Celebrate the Groundhog Day Holiday by watching this Bill Murray comedy classic with us.

 

Princess Mononoke(1997),Fri. Feb. 3 at 6 p.m. (Public Service Fellows)

A classic of Japanese anime from the celebrated Hayao Miyazaki.

 

Grand Illusion (1937), Fri. Feb. 10 at 6:30 p.m. (Dudley Classic Films)

This famous French masterpiece is often listed as one of the greatest films in cinema.  Jean Renoir’s moving story of prisoners of war, the fraternity that binds them together, the class barriers that keep them apart.

 

A League of Their Own(1992),Wed. Feb. 15 at 7:30 p.m. (Athletic Fellows)

Members of the first female professional baseball league and their coach struggle for success and acceptance.  Tom Hanks, Madonna, Rosie O’Donnell, and Geena Davis lead a great cast. “There’s no crying in baseball!”

 

Wet Hot American Summer (2001),Thurs. Feb. 16 at 6 p.m. (Dudley Staff)

A comic satire of 1980s teen movies set at a summer camp threatened by pieces of NASA’s Skylab hurtling toward earth.  Amy Poehler, Bradley Cooper and other now well-known actors enliven the scene.

 

Manhattan Murder Mystery(1993),Fri. Feb. 17 at 7 p.m.  (Arts Fellows)

Woody Allen and Diane Keaton make fun of the detective film genre while delighting in its most entertaining conventions.

 

Miracle(2004),Wed. Feb. 22 at 7 p.m. (Athletics Fellows)

The true story of the 1980 U.S. Olympic Hockey team - they improbably make the final game against the seemingly invincible Russians.  Kurt Russell plays the coach.

 

The Red Shoes(1948),Thurs. Feb. 23 at 6 p.m. (Intellectual/Cultural Fellows)

Famous classic story of a ballerina’s struggles between love and art. Spectacular dancing.

 

Bright Star(2009),  Fri. Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. (Arts Fellows)

A film exploring the relationship between Fanny Brawne and the English poet John Keats during the last three years of his life.

 

 

 

Dudley Classic Films for January@GSAS

 On the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge….Everyone welcome!  Brighten up your wintry January with these bright and funny films!

 

Friday, January 13, 6:30 p.m.

My Fair Lady (1964)  A beautiful adaptation of one of the great musical theatre creations.  Professor Higgins transforms a flower girl into a duchess through the power of language.  Audrey Hepburn, Rex Harrison and a wonderful supporting cast bring this delightful story to life.  Gorgeous sets and costumes, wonderful tunes.  Fun for everyone. (170 min.)

 

Thursday, January 19, 6:30 p.m.

The Princess Bride (1987). Inconceivable! As You Wish! My name is Inigo Montoya…yes, all the classic lines, a visit to the fire swamp, screaming eels, dastardly villains, and (sigh) Dread Pirate Roberts and Buttercup…what a great movie! (98 min.)

 

 

Several evenings on the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge – all welcome! We look forward to sharing our favorite films with you at Dudley House. Contact Susan Zawalich (zawalich@fas.harvard.edu) for more information.

“There is really no such thing as an “old” movie – just wonderful films you may not have discovered yet.”  -- Peter Bogdanovich

 

Alfred Hitchcock Presents

Friday, September 9

 6:30 p.m. North by Northwest (1959) A classic thriller.  An innocent Cary Grant is chased from New York to Mt. Rushmore by a dangerous group of spies from “both sides.” Great fun, great filmmaking. (131 min.)  

Friday, September 16

 6:30 p.m. The Birds (1963) All sorts of birds decide to make war on humanity… but why?  Will there be answers?   Join us for this unsettling Hitchcock classic. (119 min.)

 

 

Classic Films of the 1920s

Thursday, October 6 – Classic Drama  

6:00 p.m. Cinema Europe: The Unchained Camera (60 min.)  
7:00 p.m. Pandora’s Box (1929)  A stunning dramatic version of the classic play Lulu starring one of the most intriguing actresses of the silent film era, Louise Brooks. (133 min.)  

Friday, October 21 – Classic Comedy

6:00 p.m. Charlie Chaplin. City Lights (1931). An astonishing funny, sad, and beautiful masterpiece. (87 min.) 
7:45 p.m. Buster Keaton. The General (1926). One of the Great American Films. Buster is a train engineer caught up in the American Civil War. Fabulous comedy, story, photography, and performances. (107 min.) 

 

 

Spooky Classics

Friday, October 28

9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Outside of the 3rd Floor Office we’ll be running Universal Studio Classics from the 1930s….The Mummy, Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolfman … all day.  Come up and relax with the great monsters of the past and prepare for Halloween.  

 

 

Classic Romantic Comedies

Friday, November 4

6 p.m. Bringing Up Baby (1938) Cary Grant (professor) meets Katharine Hepburn (socialite). Other characters include two leopards, a dinosaur, a terrier, and other eccentrics. Great fun. (102 min.)

8 p.m. The More the Merrier (1943) A housing shortage in Washington D.C. during World War II makes strange bedfellows.  An absolutely delightful film with Jean Arthur and Joel McCrea, two of the most wonderful Hollywood stars. (104 min.) 

 

 

Holiday Film Evening

Friday, December 9

6 p.m. Annual Classic: The Sound of Music (1965). Crisp apple strudel, Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp, nuns, nazis, alps, a scheming baroness…and all those children! Irresistible for so many of us…we can’t help it.  Great fun for everyone!  (174 min.) 

2010 - 2011 Dudley House Classic Movies

Fred Astaire Birthday Festival 2011:

“A Royal Wedding, A Gay Divorcee, A Damsel in Distress, and a Top Hat in England”


 
Our annual day and night celebration of Fred Astaire’s 112th Birthday (he was born May 10, 1899) will be held on Friday, May 6. This year’s Royal Wedding in London inspires us to celebrate the inventiveness, energy, and originality of the Astaire persona in several films where his exuberance is played in contrast to the sometimes stuffy traditionalism of his English colleagues. And, of course, we will end the festival with our very own Royal Wedding (this one happens to be William’s Grandmother, then Princess Elizabeth!).Come in anytime during the day or evening to participate in the joy which this great American entertainer has brought to the world.  Films will be shown and refreshments served in the Graduate Student Lounge. Fred water and Ginger floats will be available during the festival!   All welcome.
 
12 noon.  Introduction to Fred Astaire
 
12:30 p.m.  A Damsel in Distress (1937, 98 minutes).  Fred’s one “Gingerless” musical in the 1930s.  Fred falls for Lady Alyce (Joan Fontaine) and has to overcome many obstacles to prove his worthiness.  Great fun, with George Burns and Gracie Allen, a script by P. G. Wodehouse, several eccentric characters inhabiting a stately home of England, music by George and Ira Gershwin….and “A Foggy Day in London Town.”
 
2:15 p.m. The Gay Divorcee (1934, 107 minutes).  One of the great Fred and Ginger movies. They meet “cute” in London, then continue their romance at a seaside resort.  Wonderful British character actors (Edward Everett Horton, Eric Blore, Alice Brady) enliven the comedy and the dancing and romancing are sublime.  The highlight is “Night and Day,” Cole Porter’s classic song written for Astaire…the first of the great romantic Astaire/Rogers numbers.
 
Birthday cake and coffee will be served after the film.
 
4:30 p.m.  Top Hat (1935, 101 minutes).  Perhaps the ultimate Fred and Ginger musical.  The opening scene where Fred “wakes up” the members of a stuffy London club is a treat.  Music by Irving Berlin….so many highlights…”Top Hat,” “Isn’t This a Lovely Day to be Caught in the Rain,” and the exquisite “Cheek to Cheek” lead the way.
 
6:30 p.m. Astaire scholar Chris Bamberger discusses Fred Astaire: Beyond the Clichés
The widely held image of Fred Astaire in a tuxedo or tails, dancing with Ginger Rogers, was only a part of Astaire's on-screen persona. In her presentation (through the use of film clips and rare photographs), Chris will talk about the many dimensions of Astaire and present him as an actor and singer as well as a dancer.
 
Cucumber sandwiches will be served
 
7:30 p.m.  Royal Wedding (1951, 93 minutes).  Fred and Jane Powell play a brother and sister team (based on Fred and Adele Astaire) who bring their Broadway show to London.  The town is preparing for a Royal Wedding (Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip) and thoughts of love inspire Fred and Jane as well.  Two of the greatest Astaire solos are in this film (the famous “Dancing on the Ceiling” number and a fabulously inventive dance in the exercise room of an ocean liner…Fred’s hat rack partner is one of his best!)
 
About Chris
Chris Bamberger has introduced several Astaire films at the American Film Institute’s Silver Theatre in Silver Spring, as well as at Harvard University’s Graduate Student Center in the past. She is co-moderator of the international Astaire discussion list [http://movies.groups.yahoo.com/group/astaire] and was co-director of  Fred Astaire: The Conference [http://www.faconference.org/] at Oxford University in 2008. She also assisted John Mueller in preparing a 25th anniversary reprinting of the much-admired book Astaire Dancing, by creating the screen captures of the dances he discusses in the book.
 
She lives in Arlington, Virginia, and when not watching movies, dancing, or reading, works as a freelance editor and writer.

 

 

 

 

 
Much Ado about Something:

Shakespeare’s Birthday Celebrated at Dudley!

Join us on the Monday evening after Shakespeare’s birthday (April 25), as we celebrate The Bard with films based on one of his most enjoyable comedies!  Films shown on the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge – English biscuits and other refreshments will be available.  Everyone welcome.
 
6 p.m.  Much Ado About Nothing (1993, 111 min.).  Kenneth Branagh’s wonderfully enjoyable film version.  Filmed in Tuscany and starring many of our favorite actors (including Branagh, Emma Thompson, Denzel Washington, Robert Sean Leonard, Kate Beckinsale, Keanu Reeves, Richard Briers, and Michael Keaton), this delightful and energetic retelling of the beloved comedy of love and deception is a real treat!
 
8 p.m. Much Ado About Nothing (2005, 90 min.).  An imaginative retelling of the classic comedy from the British series, Shakespeare Re-told.  This time Beatrice and Benedick are warring news anchors at a local Wessex TV station, Hero is the weather girl and Claudio is the sportscaster.  Great fun and an enjoyable “nightcap” to our earlier film as well.

 

 

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957, 161 min.)

Friday, March 11, 6:30 p.m. in the Graduate Student Lounge
 
A classic story set in a Japanese Prisoner of War Camp in Burma during WWII.  Alec Guiness is the stubborn British commander who hopes to keep up the morale of his troops by building the best possible bridge…  but by doing so he is aiding the Japanese. Sessue Hayakawa is the troubled Japanese commander, William Holden is a cynical American soldier just trying to survive.  Directed by David Lean who also directed the epic films Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago.  Winner of 7 Academy Awards, including Best Picture 1957.

 

Fabulous Fellows Film Festival at Dudley House 2011

Movies will be shown in the Graduate Student Lounge unless otherwise noted. All welcome. 
Garden State (2004), Thurs. Feb. 3 at 7 p.m. (Arts Fellows).  Having just weaned himself off antidepressants, the main character (Zach Braff) returns to his New Jersey hometown after a decade away to attend his mother’s funeral, and slowly begins to see his life in a new light. 
The Linguists (2008)  Fri. Feb. 4 at 7 p.m.  (Intellectual/Cultural Fellows)
This documentary follows two linguists as they travel through Siberia, India, and the Andes to document languages on the verge of extinction.

Raging Bull (1980), Mon. Feb. 7 at 7 p.m.  (Athletics Fellows)
Martin Scorcese directed this great American film about boxer Jake LaMotta.  Robert DeNiro gives one of his most famous and intense performances in this black and white classic.

Food, Inc. (2008), Wed. Feb. 9 at 7 p.m. (Intellectual/Cultural Fellows)
This documentary – a behind-the-scenes look at the food industry – may just change your life.

Adaptation  (2003), Thurs. Feb. 10 at 7 p.m.  (Literary Fellows)
This instant metafilmic classic, starring Nicholas Cage, Chris Cooper, and Meryl Streep, and directed by Spike Jonze, will throw you for a literary loop.

Brassed Off  (1996), Fri. Feb. 11 at 6:30 p.m.  (Dudley Classic Films)
When a British coal mine is threatened with closure by Mrs. Thatcher’s government, the miners’ brass band is what unites the community.  Esteemed actor Pete Postlethwaite, who died in January, gives one of his best performances as the conductor of the band. 

Kebab Connection (2005), Sat.  Feb. 12 at 7 p.m. (Arts Fellows)
In this airy comedy, budding filmmaker Ibo dreams of making a German kung fu movie but first hones his talent with a commercial for his uncle’s kebab stand…and it becomes an unlikely hit.

Hoosiers (1986), Mon. Feb. 14 at 7p.m. (Athletics Fellows)
Gene Hackman and Dennis Hopper star in this inspiring film about the boys from a small school basketball team and the men who coach them.

Restrepo (2010), Fri. Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. (Intellectual/Cultural Fellows)
Voted “Best Documentary” at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival, this film was made by two journalists embedded for a year with a US Army platoon posted to Afghanistan.

Flamenco (1995), Thurs. Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. (Intellectual/Cultural Fellows)
Renowned Spanish filmmaker Carlos Saura’s beautiful documentary about the passion and intensity of flamenco performers.

Winter 2010-11

December 10 –Holiday Film Evening

6 p.m.  Annual Classic: The Sound of Music 
(1965). 174 min. Crisp apple strudel, Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp, nuns, nazis, alps, a scheming baroness…and all those children! Irresistible for so many of us…we can’t help it.  Great fun for everyone!

Friday, January 14.  From Casablanca to Doctor Strangelove 

6 p.m.  Casablanca (1942, 102 min.).  One of the great classic films of American cinema.  Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henried, Claude Rains, Peter Lorre and a cast of Warner Brothers character actors cope with war and resistance in Morocco during World War II.  Romance trumps cynicism.  Round up the usual suspects.
 
8 p.m.  Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964, 95 min.) Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece of cold war angst stars Peter Sellers in three different roles.  Biting satire and black humor make this an extremely effective evocation of living in a post Hiroshima world.

Thursday, January 20. Inspiration for Readers and Writers 

6 p.m.  84 Charing Cross Road (1987, 100 min.).  If you still love physical books, London, and wonderful acting you will love this movie.  Based on an actual relationship between a New York writer and a London bookseller in the 1950s, the story conveys the differences between New York and London with great style and Anthony Hopkins and Anne Bancroft give warm performances as two people who develop a long-term relationship through letters.
 
7:45 p.m. The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (104 min.). Gene Tierney plays a widow who lives in an old ocean-front house in England.  Rex Harrison plays a deceased sea captain who haunts her life and her imagination. The tensions between living one’s life and living in one’s imagination are beautifully explored in this evocative film.

 

 

 

Fall 2010

Friday, September 10, 6:30 p.m: 50th Anniversary of To Kill A Mockingbird


To celebrate the anniversary of the publication of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel we will screen the marvelous film adaptation released in 1962. Gregory Peck won an Oscar for his portrayal of small town lawyer Atticus Finch who risked his reputation and his life to defend a black man wrongly accused of a crime. An extremely moving film, featuring extraordinary performances by child actors, a haunting score, and the first screen appearance of Robert Duvall. 

Friday, October 1Elementary, My Dear Watson: Fun with Sherlock Holmes

Two great classic films inspired by the work of the world’s most famous detective.

6:30 p.m. Sherlock, Jr. (1924) (45 min.). Buster Keaton’s masterpiece of humor and breathtaking inventiveness. Buster dreams about being a great detective and fulfills his dreams in the movie theatre.
7:30 p.mThe Hound of the Baskervilles (1939) (80 min.). This is the wonderful studio version starring that immortal duo Basil Rathbone (Holmes) and Nigel Bruce (Watson). The Footprint of a Gigantic Hound on Dartmoor leads our detectives through fog, neolithic monuments, and deadly quicksand to solve the mystery. Great classic studio filmmaking and great fun for all lovers of mystery and Sherlock Holmes.

October 22 -- Dudley Family Classics: From PIXAR


6 p.m. Up (2009).  96 min.  An amazing balloon journey leads a lonely old man and an energetic young boy scout into wild adventures.  A fabulous story of love, loss, and relationships told in the stunning Pixar way.
7:45 p.m.  WALL.E (2008).  98 min. In the distant future a lonely robot longs for connection in a desolate landscape.  A powerful message of the consequences of destroying our resources, yet a lot of fun, full of stunning imagination (and animation).

October 29 -- Spooky Classics


9 a.m. – 5 p.m.  Outside of the 3rd Floor Office we’ll be running Universal Studio Classics from the 1930s… The MummyDraculaFrankensteinThe Wolfman…. all day.  Come up and relax with the great monsters of the past and prepare for Halloween on Sunday.

November 19 - Katharine Hepburn Partnerships:  Bogart and Tracy


6 p.m.  The African Queen (1951)105 min
Katharine Hepburn is a rigid spinster, Humphrey Bogart a drunken riverboat driver.  In an emergency they are thrown together on a torturous journey.  Set in Africa during WWI, the film is a showcase for the two stars.  Bogart won his Oscar for this performance. Filmed on location in Africa, directed by John Huston.
8 p.m.  Pat and Mike (1956). 95 min.
Katharine Hepburn is an academic and “a lady athlete,” Spencer Tracy is a wise cracking promoter…an unlikely team, but they make it work.  Great portrait of women’s sports (before Title 9!) in the 50s and the role of mental focus in performance.  One of the most entertaining films made by this great movie team.

2009 - 2010 Dudley House Classic Movies

“There is really no such things as an “old” movie – just wonderful pictures you may not have discovered yet.” -- Peter Bogdanovich

Friday Evenings On the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge – all welcome! Contact Susan Zawalich (zawalich@fas.harvard.edu) for more information.

Spring 2010

Fred Astaire Birthday Festival: Change Partners

Our annual day and night celebration of Fred Astaire’s Birthday (he was born May 10, 1899 and would be 111 this year!) will be held on Friday, May 7, 2010. This year we celebrate Fred’s work with a variety of partners including Ginger Rogers, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Eleanor Powell, Judy Garland, Cyd Charisse, George Murphy, Jack Buchanan, and Oscar Levant! Come in anytime during the day or evening to participate in the joy which this great American entertainer has brought to the world. Films will be shown and refreshments served in the Graduate Student Lounge. Additional special treats will be shown between films. All welcome.

May 7 - 12 noon   An Introduction to Fred Astaire

            12:15 p.m.    A compilation of moments from some of Fred and Ginger's great scenes together will be shown, followed by a wonderful PBS documentary film from 1980: Change Partners, highlighting the work Fred did with dance partners other than Ginger.

            1:50 p.m.   Damsel In Distress (1937), 98 min. Fred's non-Ginger RKO film has a score by the Gershwins, a script by P. G. Wodehouse, and great comic foils in George Burns and Gracie Allen. Joan Fontaine is a non-dancing damsel in distress in this charming British period piece.

            Birthday cake, coffee, and tea will be served after the film!

            3:45 p.m.   Broadway Melody of 1940 (1940), 102 min. A fun film with George Murphy, Eleanor Powell, and some really fancy tap dancing. Music by Cole Porter.

            5:45 p.m.   Easter Parade (1949), 103 min. The only film Fred made with the wonderful Judy Garland. Set in the New York of 1912, this endearing movie has wonderful numbers and music by Irving Berlin.

            7:30 p.m.   The Bandwagon (1953), 112 min. A fabulous glimpse into the backstage traumas of putting on a stage musical. This is often mentioned as one of the greatest film musicals of all times. Funny, satirical, and moving, with terrific numbers. A great way to end our Birthday Celebration this year.


Celebrate Shakespeare's Birthday with us!

David Tennant will lead us through a fun celebration in the Graduate Student Lounge. Showing on the big-screen TV. Everyone welcome!

April 23 - 12 noon THE SHAKESPEARE CODE, 45 min. British Sci-Fi Hero Doctor Who journeys back in time with Martha Jones to 1599 to meet Will Shakespeare -- they inspire each other while stealing each other's best lines...and saving the earth from alien invasion! A perfect lunch-time treat!
                6 p.m.   HAMLET (2009), 183 min. David Tennant (Hamlet), Patrick Stewart (Claudius) and a fabulous ensemble cast from England's Royal Shakespeare Company give dazzling performances in a stunning modern production. 

Doctor Who: The Tenth Doctor's Last Episodes (2009)

For those of you who will still be around Cambridge during Spring Break we invite you to join us on Monday Evening, March 15, as we watch the last three episodes of the most recent series of Doctor Who, Classic British Sci-Fi TV Series. Drama, sacrifice, and more than a few tears are guaranteed!

March 15 - 6 p.m. The Waters of Mars (2009), The Doctor meddles with time---with dire consequences.
                 7 p.m. The End of Time, I. (2009), The Master Returns and Returns and ...
                 8 p.m. The End of Time, II. (2009), The Tenth Doctor is dying. Can he save the universe before he regenerates? 

Professors on the Loose!

What happens to stodgy academics when they are confronted by the whirlwind? Come see for yourself as we watch two of the most enjoyable classic films of all times! Great movie stars having a great time, great scripts, and lots of fun!

March 26 - 6 p.m. Bringing Up Baby (1938), 102 min. Cary Grant is a studious scholar, Katharine Hepburn is a ditsy heiress…when they meet up and have to face several leopards, a fearsome aunt, an energetic dog, and a huge dinosaur skeleton…well, anything and everything can happen.
                 8 p.m. Ball of Fire (1941), 111 min. Gary Cooper is working on an encyclopedia with six other squirrelly scholars…their quiet library is turned inside out when a gangster’s girlfriend (Barbara Stanwyck) decides to hide out from the police in their sanctuary. Witty and wonderful consequences follow. 


2010 February Fellows'
Film Festival
Please join us for the Tenth Annual Dudley Fellows Fabulous February Film Festival all during the month. Our current fellows and staff members are invited to choose a film or films that they love and present it to you for your entertainment. Join the fellows in the Graduate Student Lounge at Dudley House and enjoy our big-screen TV, great films and company, and various refreshments. Everyone welcomed. Note the times of the film.

The List of Films (arranged alphabetically):
  • Amélie (2001), Thurs. Feb. 11, 7 p.m. (Katie Rose)
  • For a Few Dollars More (1965), Thurs. Feb. 18, 6:30 p.m. (Keith Stone)
  • Her Sey çok Güzel Olacak (1998), Tues. Feb. 23, 7 p.m. (Mehmet Akcakaya)
  • Julie and Julia (2009), Thurs. Feb.25, 7:30 p.m. (Mary Ruth Windham)
  • The Lives of Others(2006) Fri. Feb. 26, 8 p.m. (Bert van Herck)
  • Lost in Translation (2003), Sat. Feb. 27, 7 p.m. (Charles Marcrum)
  • A Man For All Seasons (1966), Thurs. Feb. 4, 7 p.m. (Jonathan Bruno)
  • Miracle (2004), Tues. Feb. 9, 7 p.m. (Doug McClure)
  • The Music Man (1962), Fri. Feb. 5, 6 p.m. (Susan Zawalich)
  • Nanny McPhee (2005), Tues. Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m. (Zhunan Chen)
  • Pride and Prejudice (1995), Sat. Feb. 13, 1 p.m. (Chad Conlan)
  • Pyaar Ke Side Effects (2006), Wed. Feb. 24, 7 p.m. (Dinyar Patel)
  • Sherlock Holmes Episodes, Tues., Feb. 2, 7 p.m. (Literary Fellows)
  • This is It (2009), Fri., Feb. 12, 6 p.m. (Jean-François Charles)
  • Tulpan (2008), Wed. Feb. 17, 7 p.m. (Esra Sahin)
  • Young Yakuza (2007), Fri. Feb. 19, 7 p.m. (Esra Sahin)

For more information about each film see the descriptions at left, check out the February GSAS Bulletin, or check the printed sheets available in the lobby or in the House Office.

2010 Fabulous Fellows' Film Festival at Dudley House

Movies will be shown in the Graduate Student Lounge unless otherwise noted. All welcome.

An Evening with Sherlock HolmesTuesday, February 2 at 7 p.m. (Literary Fellows). Join us for the follow-up to January's book club discussion of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's memorable English detective. We'll watch a selection of episodes from lively television versions made during the 20th century. Door prizes will be awarded, and we'll have all the necessary equipment (including real sherry) on hand!

A Man for All Seasons (1966), Thursday, February 4 at 7 p.m. (Jonathan Bruno). This is the story of King Henry VIII's trial and persecution of Sir Thomas More, the statesman, humanist, philosopher, and (now) saint. An enduring tale about the triumph of faith and conscience during dark times. Paul Scofield won the best actor Oscar for his memorable performance as Sir Thomas More and the picture won the Best Film Oscar that year as well.

The Music Man (1962), Friday, February 5 at 6 p.m. (Susan Zawalich). One of the Great American Musicals. In 1912 Professor Harold Hill (Robert Preston), a con man, visits a small Iowa town and convinces the people that what they really need is a boys’ band (complete with Seventy Six Trombones!). Local librarian and piano teacher Marion Paroo (Shirley Jones) is more than suspicious. Wonderful music and performances make this a delightful experience. Bring friends. We’ll have our own little Ice Cream Sociable to celebrate.

Miracle (2004), Tuesday, February 9 at 7 p.m. (Doug McClure). Based on the true story of one of the greatest moments in sports history, the dramatic hockey game between the legendary Soviet Union team and the US team (a bunch of college kids) at the 1980 Olympics. Kurt Russell stars as coach Herb Brooks.

Amélie (2001), Thursday, February 11 at 7 p.m. (Katie Rose). French director Jean-Pierre Jeunet tells the story of a Amélie (Audrey Tatou), a shy waitress in a Montmartre café, living a sheltered life. After seeing the effect of a good deed on a stranger, she embarks on a quest to touch the lives of others in her own mischievous, mysterious manner, finding adventure and romance along the way. French with English subtitles. 

This Is It (2009), Friday, February 12 at 6 p.m. (Jean-François Charles). Michael Jackson died before a scheduled concert in London -- this is a film of the rehearsal for the concert. If you're a fan, you'll enjoy seeing the movie once again! If you haven't seen it yet, well, it's time to discover yet another facet of this unique artist. 

Pride and Prejudice (1995), Saturday, February 13, from 1 to 6 p.m. (Chad Conlan). This is the BBC mini series starring Colin Firth (Mr. Darcy) and Jennifer Ehle (Elizabeth Bennet). Bring your lunch if you’d like and join us to relive the romance and drama of Andrew Davies’ lavish adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic novel. 300 minutes. A wonderful way to spend a Saturday afternoon. Refreshments will be served. Tea, anyone?

Nanny McPhee (2005), Tuesday, February 16 at 7:30 p.m. (Zhunan Chen). Mr. Cedric Brown has just lost his wife and is left to cope on his own with his seven naughty children. Seventeen previous nannies have left in despair. Nanny McPhee is the 18th nanny. Watch what happens! Starring Colin Firth and Emma Thompson.

Tulpan (2008), Wednesday, February 17 at 7 p.m. (Esra Sahin). Acclaimed documentarian Sergey Dvortsevoy's debut narrative feature, Tulpan, is a work of extraordinary filmmaking bravado, an exhilaratingly alive and sweet-natured fairytale set in the barren landscape of a Kazakh steppe, an environment where only shepherds live. 

For A Few Dollars More (1965), Thursday, February 18 at 6:30 p.m. (Keith Stone). Directed by Sergio Leone, score by Enrico Morricone. The Man with No Name (Clint Eastwood) teams up with gunslinger Colonel Mortimer (Lee Van Cleef) to win the bounty offered for the bandit Indio (Gian Maria Volonte).

Young Yakuza (2007), Friday, February 19 at 7 p.m. (Zhunan Chen). Filmed by Jean Pierre Limosin over an 18-month period, Young Yakuza explores the Japanese crime underworld, through the portraits of two figures: 20-year-old Naoki, a new recruit of the Kumagai crime organization, and his boss, both confronted by new social trends which are gradually edging out the yakuza gangsters.

Her Sey çok Güzel Olacak (1998), Tuesday, February 23 at 7 p.m. (Mehmet Akcakaya). Altan, a small-time crook, digs himself deeper into trouble the harder he tries to get out of it in this very funny comedy from Turkey. In Turkish with English subtitles.

Pyaar Ke Side Effects (2006), Wednesday, February 24 at 7 p.m. (Dinyar Patel). A wonderful Bollywood movie.

Julie and Julia (2009), Thursday, February 25 at 7:30 p.m. (Mary Ruth Windham). Based on two true stories, Julie and Julia intertwines the lives of Julie Powell and Julia Child who, though separated by time and space, are both at loose ends...until they discover that with the right combination of passion, fearlessness and butter, anything is possible. Meryl Streep and Amy Adams star.

Das Leben der Anderen (The Lives of Others) (2006), Friday, February 26 at 8 p.m. (Bert Van Herck). Set in 1980s East Berlin, director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s film (which earned an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film) provides an exquisitely nuanced portrait of life under the watchful eye of the state police. When a successful playwright and his actress companion become subjects of the Stasi's secret surveillance program, their friends, family -- and even those doing the watching -- find their lives forever changed. In German with English subtitles.

Lost in Translation (2003), Saturday, February 27 at 7 p.m. (Charles Marcrum). Two lost souls visiting Tokyo -- the young, neglected wife (Scarlett Johansson) of a photographer and a washed-up movie star (Bill Murray, in an Oscar-nominated role) shooting a TV commercial -- find an odd solace and pensive freedom to be real in each other's company, away from their lives in America.




January @ GSAS Film Classics

Join us in the Graduate Student Lounge in January to enjoy some really great America Film Classics. A wonderful way to relax and to see films you have always loved…or always wanted to see! Popcorn and Soda will be served. 

Friday, January 15 - 6 p.m. High Noon (1952), 85 min. Gary Cooper won an Oscar for his iconic portrayal of a Marshal abandoned by the town he has sworn to protect. Grace Kelly also stars. This is one of the great classic Westerns in the American film pantheon.
                                7:45 p.m. North by Northwest (1959), 131 min. One of the all-time classic Alfred Hitchcock Thrillers. This one stars Cary Grant as a New York advertising executive mistaken for a spy and chased across the country by James Mason and his henchmen. The chase ends with an astounding climb down the face of Mt. Rushmore! Enormous fun. 

Friday, January 22 - 6 p.m. Roman Holiday (1953), 118 min. Audrey Hepburn won her Oscar for this winning performance as a princess escaping her duties in Rome… she meets up with Gregory Peck and has a wonderful holiday. Wonderful scenes filmed in Rome and the captivating Miss Hepburn make for a fabulous movie experience.
                                8 p.m. Citizen Kane (1941), 119 min. Orson Welles’ Masterpiece, often cited as the greatest American film ever made. A study of a newspaper tycoon, his life, his loves, his rise and fall. An amazing, moving, and exhilarating film for everyone. You can’t see it too many times…and if you haven’t seen it yet…here’s a great chance! 


Fall 2009

Fly Me to the Moon…And Beyond

In honor of the 40th anniversary this year of human beings first setting foot on our moon we will visit the stars together in September and explore through classic films the challenges human beings might face in confronting the unknown. Popcorn and soft drinks will help us along in our journeys.

September 11 - 6 p.m. The Dish (2000), 101 min. A wonderful film set in a small Australian town where a radio observatory dish is part of NASA's coverage of the first Moon Landing. As it turns out, the work of the staff of the observatory will be the only possible source for TV pictures of the historic event. Will it work? How does the momentous space trip affect everyone who lives near The Dish? A lovely human study and a very entertaining story.
                          8 p.m. Forbidden Planet (1956), 98 min. An absolutely classic Sci-Fi film of the 1950s. Astronauts find survivors and many mysteries on a distant planet. The first sci-fi film to use an electronic music score…the debut of screen icon Robby the Robot…a reworking of the Shakespeare play, The Tempest….and a rampaging id….this film has it all! 

September 25 - 6 p.m. Midnight (2008), 45 min. A classic episode of the new version of the British Sci-Fi Series, Doctor Who. The Doctor is in need of a rest and joins a tour group to visit a vacation planet….then something goes terribly wrong…and an encounter with an alien life force brings forth disturbing facets of human nature.
                          7 p.m. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), 141 min. Stanley Kubrick's amazing version of the Arthur C. Clarke sci-fi classic story. A mysterious black monolith appears on earth, on the moon, and on Jupiter. What does it all mean? And what is wrong with HAL, the super computer?? Things could get very strange….. A must see film for everyone. 


Dudley Family Classics

October 2 - 6 p.m. The Wizard of Oz (1939), 101 min. Somewhere Over the Rainbow Dorothy, Toto, The Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion search for the Wizard…and run into witches and other adventures along the way. A beautiful print and no commercials(!) will help to make this a memorable evening for children of all ages. 


American Musicals in Paris

October 16 - 6 p.m. Love Me Tonight (1932), 96 min. An early film musical with Maurice Chevalier and Jeannette McDonald…music by Rodgers and Hart…absolutely wonderful..witty, charming, inventive and loads of fun.
                          7:45 p.m. Funny Face (1957), 103 min. Audrey Hepburn, Fred Astaire, Paris settings and fashions, and music by the Gershwins. S'Wonderful. 


Spooky Classics

October 30 - 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.Outside of the 3rd Floor Office we'll be running Universal Studio Classics… The MummyDraculaThe Wolfman…. all day. Come up and relax with the great monsters of the past and prepare for Halloween tomorrow. 


Classic American Genres of the 1950s

November 13 - 6 p.m. Sci-Fi: The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957), 81 min. An atomic radiation cloud has a strange effect on a young man…he keeps getting smaller and smaller and the cat and spider keep getting larger…a really stunning movie treat.
                          7:45 p.m. Melodrama: Written on the Wind (1956), 99 min. Rock Hudson, Lauren Bacall, Dorothy Malone, and Robert Stack play out their story in lurid Technicolor, with fervid music and flaming nostrils….the rhumba of death scene is one of the classics in this powerful portrayal of 1950s social and sexual angst. 


Holiday Film Evenings

In honor of the 40th anniversary this year of human beings first setting foot on our moon we will visit the stars together in September and explore through classic films the challenges human beings might face in confronting the unknown. Popcorn and soft drinks will help us along in our journeys.

Friday, December 11 - 6 p.m. Annual ClassicThe Sound of Music (1965), 174 min. Crisp apple strudel, Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp, nuns, nazis, alps, a scheming baroness…and all those children! Irresistible for so many of us…we can't help it. Great fun for everyone! 

Thursday, December 17 - 6 p.m. It's a Wonderful Life (1946), 130 min. Jimmy Stewart gets stuck in Bedford Falls wondering what his life is worth. Frank Capra's classic film is a wonderful antidote to the stress of exams and papers.

2008-2009 Dudley House Classic Movies

“There is really no such things as an “old” movie – just wonderful pictures you may not have discovered yet.” -- Peter Bogdanovich

Friday Evenings On the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge – all welcome! Contact Susan Zawalich (zawalich@fas.harvard.edu) for more information.

Friday, April 17. 6 p.m. Graduate Student Lounge
Easter Parade (1948). Help us enjoy the spring by watching this MGM musical classic starring Judy Garland and Fred Astaire, in their only film together. Wonderful music by Irving Berlin and fabulous numbers make this an absolute delight.

Friday, April 24. 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Graduate Student Lounge

Celebrate Shakespeare's Birthday with us this evening (April 23 is the "official" date) by watching two highly enjoyable "riffs" on The Bard and his plays:

6:30 p.m. *Will Shakespeare meets Dr. Who* in "The Shakespeare Code." Join us to watch this really fun episode of the new Dr. Who sci-fi series. The Doctor and his companion Martha Jones journey back to 1599 to meet the playwright and end up offering him some intriguing inspiration for future works...as well as saving Planet Earth from aliens (disguised as witches!) at the same time. 45 min.

7:30 p.m. *Shakespeare Retold*. This amusing BBC series crafts modern versions of plots of several Shakespeare plays. Tonight we'll watch "The Taming of the Shrew," where a conservative MP weds an impecunious aristocrat and sparks fly.

_Fred Astaire Birthday Festival: Fred and Ginger: 75 Years Together -- Friday, May 8 _

Our annual day and night celebration of Fred Astaire’s Birthday (he was born May 10, 1899 and would be 110 this year!) will be held on Friday, May 8. This year we celebrate the 75th anniversary of one of the greatest partnerships in entertainment history and the greatest dance team to ever appear on the silver screen: Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. Come in anytime during the day or evening to participate in the joy which these great American entertainers have brought to the world. Films will be shown and refreshments served in the Graduate Student Lounge. Additional special treats will be shown between films. All welcome.


12 noon. Introduction to Fred Astaire and light lunch (Fred Spring Water, Ginger Ale, and Ginger Beer will be available)

12:15 p.m. PBS Documentary: *Fred Astaire: Puttin’ on His Top Hat*

Part 1 of this excellent documentary discusses Fred’s important contributions to dance, song, theatre, and film with a special emphasis on his work with Ginger Rogers at RKO in the 1930s. Narrated by Joanne Woodward, with guest commentaries by many luminaries including Rudolph Nureyev. Lots of great film clips…a wonderful hour of introduction.

Dance Numbers from Flying Down to Rio (1933) and Gay Divorcee (1934)

1:45 p.m. *Follow the Fleet* (1936, 110 min.) Fred and Ginger are former dance partners who meet up again while Fred is on shore leave from the Navy and Ginger is working in a low-class joint as a dancer. Marvelous dancing by Fred and Ginger and wonderful music by Irving Berlin. The haunting dance to “Let’s Face the Music and Dance,” was a great favorite during the Great Depression.

Birthday cake, coffee, and tea will be served after the film.

Dance numbers from Roberta (1935) and Carefree (1938)

4:15 p.m. *The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle* (1939, 90 min.). Fred and Ginger play Vernon and Irene Castle, another famous dance team of the early twentieth century. This lovely biopic showcases the wonderful acting skills of both artists and is a loving evocation of a vanished era….both of the Castles and of Fred and Ginger themselves, since this was the last movie they made together in the 1930s (they reunited in one more film, The Barkleys of Broadway, 10 years later, for MGM).

Short Dinner break

6:15 *Top Hat* (1935, 101 min.) The quintessential Fred and Ginger movie. Irving Berlin classics include “Isn’t This a Lovely Day to Be Caught in the Rain,” “Top Hat,” and “Cheek to Cheek.” The dancing, the chemistry, the wonderful supporting players, and the exuberance of the whole film are simply magical.

“They Can’t Take That Away From Me” from Shall We Dance (1937), and The Barkleys of Broadway (1949)

8 p.m. *Swing Time* (1936, 105 min.) For many people this is the greatest of the Fred and Ginger musicals. Music by Jerome Kern, breathtaking dance numbers, and, again, that marvelous chemistry will end our festival on the highest of high notes.

 

Fabulous Fellows Film Festival at Dudley House 2009

Movies will be shown in the Graduate Student Lounge unless otherwise noted. All welcome.

Letters from Iwo Jima (2006). Mon. Feb. 2 at 8 p.m. (Esra-Gokce Sahin)

Clint Eastwood's film about the WWII Battle of Iwo Jima told from the perspective of the Japanese soldiers. 141 min.

Real Genius (1985), Tues. Feb. 3 at 7 p.m. (Doug McClure)

One of the youngest students ever accepted to Pacific Tech, Mitch Taylor, and his roommate, Chris Knight (Val Kilmer), legendary for his irreverent antics as much as his brilliance, are teamed up on a project to develop a high-powered laser. When they learn that Professor Hathaway (William Atherton) has been lying to them about the true purpose of the project, revenge becomes a moral imperative. 108 min.

Kama Sutra, A Tale of Love (1996), Thurs. Feb. 5 at 7 p.m. (Anouska Bhattacharyya)

Set in 16th Century India , Kama Sutra is the tale of two girls, Maya and Tara, one a lowly servant, the other a noble princess, both raised together as children. Despite their friendship, Maya is constantly reminded of her inferior status. Through her striking beauty and her knowledge of the Kama Sutra, the Indian book of love, Maya exacts her revenge on Tara and seduces her husband on her wedding day. Thus begins a destructive struggle for power where revenge is the goal, but tragedy the outcome. 114 min.

Sentimental British Classics , Fri. Feb. 6 at 6 and 7:45 p.m. (Susan Zawalich)

Brief Encounter (1945), 6 p.m.

In 1940s Britain two ordinary people, married and settled in their lives, meet weekly at a train station….and, improbably, they fall in love. What will happen? This classic black and white bittersweet romance was written by Noel Coward and directed by David Lean. Lots of train smoke, tears, and Rachmaninoff. 86 min.

Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939), 7:45 p.m.

The 1939 British schoolboy classic that won an Oscar for Robert Donat. He plays Arthur Chipping, the shy classics master at an all-boys public school in England . He eventually becomes “an institution” himself … see how it happens. Bring Kleenex. 114 min.

Silent Film at Café Gato Rojo: An Evening of Comedy with Buster Keaton (1920s) Tues, Feb. 10 at 7 p.m. (Jonathan Ruel)

Come enjoy a projection of comedies by the master of silent film while the Gato Rojo is operating as usual. Or just stop by for tea or coffee with some laughs and a great ambiance.

Arrested Development Season 1 (2003), Wed. Feb. 11 at 7 p.m., Thurs. Feb. 12th at 7p.m., Fri. Feb 13th at 6 p.m. (Mary Ruth, Di Yin, Tina Lin, Sahand Hormoz, Jon Fan) 

Arrested Development is a TV comedy series about the tales of the dysfunctional Bluth family.  Come and watch Michael Bluth attempt to straighten his family out in hilarious outcome in this Emmy winning and critically acclaimed work.  We will be showing the complete first season back to back to back (each evening has ~2hrs worth of material).

The Sting (1973), Fri. Feb. 13 at 8 p.m. (Jonathan Bruno)

Robert Redford and Paul Newman join forces in this inventive and hilarious story of cops and conmen in 1930s Chicago . 129 min.

Dr. Bronner's Magic Soapbox (2006). Tues. Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m. (Enoch Lambert)

A human story about a socially responsible company, “Dr. Bronner's Magic Soapbox” documents the complicated family legacy behind the counterculture's favorite cleaning product — Bronner's son, 68-year-old Ralph, endured over 15 orphanages and foster homes as a child, but, despite difficult memories, is his father's most ardent fan. 88 min

Darwin 's Nightmare (2004), Wed. Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. (J. P. Sniadecki)

An important documentary centering on a booming multinational industry of fish and weapons, creating an ungodly globalized alliance on the shores of the world's biggest tropical lake: an army of local fishermen, World Bank agents, homeless children, African ministers, EU-commissioners, Tanzanian prostitutes, and Russian pilots are involved. 107 min.

Persepolis (2007) Thurs. Feb. 19 at 7 p.m. (Laura Tully) 
A moving and beautiful animated film based on the graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi. This is the story of the coming-of-age of an outspoken Iranian girl, Marji, who lives through the Shah's defeat in the Iranian Revolution of 1979 and observes the subsequent rule by Islamic fundamentalists become a repressive tyranny of its own. With Marji dangerously refusing to remain silent at this injustice, her parents send her abroad to Vienna to study for a better life. Marji feels displaced and the film follows her through her life as she searches for where she truly belongs.  96 min.

Kung Fu Panda (2008), Fri. Feb. 20 at 7 p.m. (Yanyan Liu)

It's the story about a lazy, irreverent slacker panda, named Po , who is the biggest fan of Kung Fu. Unexpectedly chosen to fulfill an ancient prophecy, Po 's dreams become reality when he joins the world of Kung Fu and studies alongside his idols, the legendary Furious Five -- Tigress, Crane, Mantis, Viper, and Monkey -- under the leadership of their guru, Master Shifu. Can he turn his dreams of becoming a Kung Fu master into reality? 92 min.

Black Beetle (1982), Mon. Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. (Enoch Lambert)

“Beetle” tells the “true story” of Besouro, a Capoeira master living in 1920s Brazil . The film's title comes from the name Besouro Manganga, which is a large and dark species of maybug. According to legends surrounding the historical figure, Besouro was known to vanish whenever he was faced with an uneven fight. This grew into the myth that Besouro had supernatural powers and could dodge bullets and even turn himself into a beetle to scare his opponents. 100 min.

Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986). Tues. Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. (Jonathan Schneiderman)

Ferris is a street-wise kid who knows all the tricks. He decides to take the day off and invites his friend, Cameron Fry, and girlfriend, Sloane Peterson, to join him, while taking Cameron's father's precious Ferrari for transportation. All the while, the principal, Ed Rooney, is determined to prove Ferris is faking his illness and Ferris's agitated sister, Jeanie, also has a goal to catch Ferris off guard. A must see for anyone who misses the 80's. 102 min.

Cape No 7 (Hai Jiao Qi Hao) (2008). Wed. Feb. 25 at 7 p.m. (Peiqiu Chen)

Aga, a band singer, returns to Hengchun with frustration. Tomoko is a Japanese model assigned to organize a local warm-up band for the Japanese super star beach concert. Together with five other ordinary Hengchun residents they form an impossible band. 129 min.

Inside Man (2006), Fri. Feb. 27 at 6 p.m. (Jean-François Charles)

Directed by Spike Lee, starring Denzel Washington, Clive Owen, and Jodie Foster.

It looked like the perfect bank robbery… but you can't judge a crime by its cover. The movie starts like this: "My name is Dalton Russell. Pay strict attention to what I say because I choose my words carefully and I never repeat myself. I've told you my name: that's the Who. The Where could most readily be described as a prison cell." Don't be late! 129 min.

 

September 19 – Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin: Classic Comics of the Silent Screen

Join us as we enjoy two of the greatest, most brilliant films ever made. The amazing physical dexterity, creativity, and imagination of Keaton and Chaplin have truly never been equaled.

6 p.m. Sherlock, Jr. (1924, 45 min.). One of Buster Keaton's true masterpieces. Our hero is a film projectionist who really wants to be a detective. Falling asleep at the reel, he enters his film world to solve his real world problems. Breathtaking moments abound.

7:15 p.m. City Lights (1931, 87 min.). Charlie Chaplin's classic portrayal of The Tramp making his way through a hostile city in shaky economic times. As relevant today as in 1931, and full of wonderful scenes, physical comedy, and moving revelations.

October 3 – The Muppets Visit Dudley

6 p.m. We'll start with a couple choice episodes of The Muppet Show with Kermit, Piggy, Fozzie, and Special Guest Stars.

7 p.m. The Muppet Movie (1979, 95 min.). The Muppets journey west to try their luck in Hollywood. A highlight is Kermit's rendition of “The Rainbow Connection.”

Other songs and delightful performances by the Muppet crew make this Jim Henson film a real treat for all ages.

October 17 – Woody Allen: Agent and Chameleon

6 p.m. Broadway Danny Rose (1984, 84 min.) Woody plays a long-time Broadway agent who may have finally found a client to make him a success, after a lifetime of shepherding rather sad acts. A beautifully written and acted study of loyalty, betrayal, and the complications of human relationships…and also very funny.

7:45 p.m. Zelig (1983, 79 min.). Certainly one of the great “mockumentaries” in American cinema, this is the story of Leonard Zelig who had such low self-esteem that he developed an amazing ability to “become” anyone he was with…thus earning the nickname of “The Human Chameleon.” A wonderful study of conformity and redemption and a brilliant piece of filmmaking. With Woody Allen, Mia Farrow, and cameo “documentary” appearances by many famous people of the 1930s.

November 7– Strangers in a Foreign Land

6 p.m. Babette's Feast (1987, 102 min.). This exquisite Danish film tells the story of the impact a French domestic has on the lives of simple people in a small, isolated Danish village in the 19 th century. Based on a story by Isak Dinesen, the film beautifully explores the importance of community, openness to the world, and … food! In Danish with English subtitles.

8 p.m. A Room With a View (1985, 117 min.) This is the Merchant/Ivory film version of the E. M. Forster novel about the coming of age of a young English woman who visits Florence with her very proper chaperone. The film features beautiful cinematography and delightful performances by a wonderful British cast including Helena Bonham-Carter, Maggie Smith, Simon Callow, Judi Dench, and Daniel Day-Lewis (who gives an amazing performance as an upper-class prig…very different from some of his other more flamboyant portrayals).

Holiday Film Evenings:

Friday, November 21 – 6 p.m. Annual Classic: The Sound of Music

Crisp apple strudel, Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp, nuns, nazis, alps, a scheming baroness…and all those children! Irresistible for so many of us…we can't help it. Great fun for everyone! (1965, 174 min)

Tuesday, December 16 -- 6 p.m. Love, Actually

Prepare for the holidays ahead by watching this lovely film, following the stories of various couples as they explore the heartbreaks and the possibilities of relationships. A great cast includes Emma Thompson, Colin Firth, Hugh Grant, Alan Rickman, and Keira Knightly. (2003, 135 min.)

Dudley House Classic Movies 2007-2008

“There is really no such things as an “old” movie – just wonderful pictures you may not have discovered yet.” -- Peter Bogdanovich

On the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge – all welcome! Contact Susan Zawalich (zawalich@fas.harvard.edu) for more information.

Shakespeare Retold (BBC). Friday, April 25 in the Graduate Student Lounge

Celebrate Shakespeare's birthday (April 23) with us by watching one or both of these imaginative "retellings" of the plot of two of Shakespeare's most famous plays...

At 6 p.m. Much Ado About Nothing. Set in the present day, Beatrice and Benedick are rival news anchors, Hero is the weather girl, and Claudio the sports reporter. See how the great comedy/romance plays out in this interesting setting. There will be lines from the play and situations that you will recognize...but these are new screenplays, so come and enjoy the fun.

At 8 p.m. Macbeth. In this reimagining of the plot Macbeth is a master chef, Lady Macbeth is the hostess in the upscale restaurant owned by Duncan (who is a famous cooking star on TV). The witches are transformed into garbage men...a really chilling and effective new look at this classic tale of ambition, resentment, and guilt. Starring James McAvoy (from ATONEMENT) as the conflicted Scottish chef.

Fred Astaire Birthday Festival: Around the World with Fred Astaire (May 9)

Our annual day and night celebration of Fred Astaire’s 109th Birthday (he was born May 10, 1899) will be held on Friday, May 9. This year we celebrate the inventiveness, energy, and originality of the Astaire persona in several films where his character travels by plane, boat, and automobile to some wonderful places. Journey with us in the afternoon to South America….join up with the Flying Tigers just back from China, off for a brief respite in New York…then on to Paris for the evening…. Come in anytime during the day or evening to participate in the joy which this great American entertainer has brought to the world. Films will be shown and refreshments served in the Graduate Student Lounge. Additional special treats will be shown between films. All welcome.

12 noon. Introduction to Fred Astaire and lunch

12:30 p.m. Flying Down to Rio (1933, 89 min.) Fred’s second film appearance and the first movie he made with Ginger Rogers. A fun and slightly crazy early film musical with Delores Del Rio and Gene Raymond as the stars…but once Fred and Ginger danced “The Carioca” movies were never the same!

2:00 p.m. You Were Never Lovelier (1942, 97 min.) Fred’s second film with the gorgeous Rita Hayworth is set in Argentina. Music written by Jerome Kern. Xavier Cugat and his band add energy to the festivities.

Birthday cake, coffee, and tea will be served after the film.

4:15 p.m. The Sky’s the Limit (1943, 89 min.) A World War II classic, much beloved by Astaire fans. Fred is a member of “The Flying Tigers,” a group of fliers who have a few days leave in New York before returning to the war. He meets Joan Leslie and Robert Benchley in the city and tries to sort out his life in the meantime. The most famous number is the amazing “One For My Baby and One More For the Road.”

Dinner break

6:15 Roberta (1935, 106 min.) Irresistible Fred and Ginger film set in Paris. Fred and Ginger are old friends who have lost touch…they reconnect in Paris where Fred’s pal inherits a dress shop. Starring Irene Dunne and Randolph Scott and featuring an amazing array of 1930s fashions…and a rather amusing French lesson. The film contains several of Fred and Ginger’s greatest dance numbers. Music by Jerome Kern.

8 p.m. Funny Face (1957, 103 min.) More Paris fashions, this time modeled by the enchanting Audrey Hepburn. Music by the Gershwins. Beautiful color, charming dance numbers, and many scenes shot on location in Paris make this a special treat for our final film in this year’s festival.

Past Movies

September 28 – Noble Outlaws Meet Nasty Nobles in Fun-Filled Forests

6 p.m.    The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938).  The ultimate swashbuckling classic, filmed in glorious Technicolor, starring Errol Flynn as Robin, Olivia De Havilland as Marian, Basil Rathbone as Sir Guy, and Claude Rains as the even more dastardly Prince John…you’ll never have a better time at the movies.  102 min.

8 p.m.  The Court Jester (1955).  An affectionate send-up of swashbuckling classics.  Danny Kaye is the reluctant jester…until he is hypnotized and becomes the epitome of panache. Several fun musical numbers and a lot of tongue twisting dialogue (“The pellet with the poison’s in the chalice from the palace…the flagon with the dragon has the brew that is true!”  etc.)  101 min.

October 12 – Kermit and Miss Piggy Meet Beauty and the Beast

6 p.m.   We’ll start with a couple choice episodes of The Muppet Show with Kermit, Piggy, Fozzie, and Special Guest Stars

7 p.m. Beauty and the Beast (1991).  Disney’s animated musical version of the beloved fairy tale.

Be Our Guest.

October 26 – Witty and Wonderful: Cary Grant Romances

6 p.m. The Awful Truth (1937).  Cary Grant and Irene Dunne are a beautifully-matched couple on their way to a divorce….will they come to their senses before it’s too late?  And who will get custody of their adorable dog?  A wonderfully-written, delightfully-acted comedy.  91 min.

7:45 p.m.  Holiday (1938).  One of four movies Grant made with Katharine Hepburn. In this one he’s engaged to her sister.  Will he discover his real soul mate in time to sail off with her into the sunrise?  Amusing character actors add to the delight of this classic film. 95 min.

November 16 – Pre-War, Post-War: Classics of European Cinema

6 p.m. The Rules of the Game (La Règle du jeu) (1939).  Jean Renoir’s famous film depicts The Human Comedy at a French chateau on the eve of the cataclysmic destruction of World War II. In French with English subtitles.  106 min.

8 p.m.  The Third Man (1949). Filmed on location in bombed-out Vienna, this classic of British cinema deals with the struggles of a civilization trying to put itself back together after the devastations of war.  Orson Welles gives an unforgettable performance as an amoral American working the black market.  A zither, a ferris wheel, the sewers….you’ll never forget this film. 104 min.

Friday, December 7 , 6 p.m.  Annual Holiday Classic: The Sound of Music

Crisp apple strudel, Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp, nuns, nazis, alps, a scheming baroness…and all those children! Irresistible for so many of us…we can’t help it.  Great fun for everyone!

Friday, January 11, 6 p.m. Lawrence of Arabia (1962). 227 min

The famous epic film about T. E. Lawrence and the Arabian campaign in World War I. Directed by David Lean, starring Peter O'Toole, this is a visually spectacular film and intriguing character study of a conflicted British soldier…a tool of British colonialism?….a willing partner in deception?….a friend of Arabia?…and what does it all mean? A particularly relevant film considering current problems in Iraq and the Mid East and a rousing, great movie. (227 min.)

Wednesday, January 16, Silent Classics: Cinema Europe and Metropolis

6 p.m. Cinema Europe: Documentary about European Silent Film. 60 min. 
7 p.m. Metropolis (1926). 124 min. 

The great German silent science fiction classic. One of the most influential films of all times. We'll watch the newly-restored version.

Fabulous Fellows Film Festival

Come join us all through February as the Fellows present some of their favorite movies! All movies will be shown in the Graduate Student Lounge. 

Zoolander (2001), Fri. Feb. 1 at 8 p.m. (Mary Ruth Windham)
In the twilight of his career, male supermodel DerekZoolander is brainwashed to kill the prime minister of Malaysia.After crackerjack reporter Matilda discovers the plot, she and Derekteam up with Derek's arch rival Hansel to uncover the ugliness behindthe beautiful business.  89 min.

The Battle of Algiers (1966), Tues. Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. (Rita Banerjee)
One of the most influential political films in history, Gillo Pontecorvo’s The Battle of Algiers (La bataille d’Alger) vividly recreates a key year in the tumultuous Algerian struggle for independence from the occupying French in the 1950s. As violence escalates on both sides, children shoot soldiers at point-blank range, women plant bombs in cafés, and French soldiers resort to torture to break the will of the insurgents. Shot in the streets of Algiers in documentary style, the film is a case study in modern warfare, with its terrorist attacks and the brutal techniques used to combat them.  The film continues to have relevance today. 121 min.

In the Mood for Love (2001), Thurs. Feb. 7 at 6 p.m. (Michael Kagan)
The film is set in Hong Kong, 1962. Chow Mo-Wan is a newspaper editor who moves into a new building with his wife. At approximately the same time, Su Li-zhen, a beautiful secretary and her executive husband also move in to the crowded building. With their spouses often away, Chow and Li-zhen spend most of their time together as friends. Soon, they are shocked to discover that their spouses are having an affair. Hurt and angry, they find comfort in their growing friendship. 98 min.

Twelve Angry Men (1957), Thurs. Feb. 7 at 8 p.m. (Will Yuen)
The defense and the prosecution have rested and the jury is filing into the jury room to decide if a young Spanish-American is guilty or innocent of murdering his father. What begins as an open and shut case of murder soon becomes a mini-drama of each of the juror’s prejudices and preconceptions about the trial, the accused, and each other. 96 min.

Underground (1995), Fri. Feb. 8 at 8 p.m. (Cinthya Torres)
Director: Emir Kusturica. The story starts from an underground manufacture of weapons of Belgrade, during the WWII, and evolves into fairly surreal situations. Theblack marketeer who smuggles the weapons to partisans forgets to mention to theworkers that the war is over, and they keep producing. Fifty years later theybecome suspicious, and break out of their underground "shelter" --- only toconvince themselves that the guy was right: the war is still going on. 167 min.

This is Spinal Tap (1984), Mon. Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. (Michael Barrett)
The first film from director Rob Reiner is the quintessential mockumentary: Spinal Tap, a heavy metal band whose best days are behind them, are on tour in the US to promote their latest release, "Smell the Glove," and documentarian Marty DiBergi is there to capture the sights, sounds, and smells of a real rock-and-roll band.  From big hair and cricket bats to spontaneous human combustion, this movie has it all!  82 min.

Apocalypse Now (1979), Wed. Feb. 13 at 8 p.m. (Chris Hayward) 
Apocalypse Now is a 1979 Academy Award, Cannes Palme d'Or, and Golden Globe winning American film set during the Vietnam War. It tells the story of Army Captain Benjamin L. Willard who is sent into the jungle to assassinate United States Army Special Forces Colonel Walter E. Kurtz, who is said to have gone insane. The film has been viewed as a journey into the darkness of the human psyche. The film was directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a script by Coppola, John Milius, and Michael Herr, and was in large part based on Joseph Conrad's novella "Heart of Darkness" (1899), as well as drawing elements from Herr's "Dispatches" (1977), and from Werner Herzog's "Aguirre, the Wrath of God" (1972). The film stars Martin Sheen as Captain Benjamin L. Willard (based on Marlow in Conrad's novella), Marlon Brando as Colonel Kurtz, Dennis Hopper as a photojournalist, and Robert Duvall in an Oscar-nominated turn as the wild Lt. Colonel Bill Kilgore. Running time: 153 minutes. Note: We will view the original 1979 version, not the 2001 "Redux" version.

Amélie (2001),Thurs. Feb. 14 at 7 p.m.(Katie Humphry)
Amélie, an innocent and naive girl in Paris, with her own sense of justice, decides to help those around her and, along the way, discovers love. In French, with English subtitles.  122 min.

I Know Where I’m Going (1945), Fri. Feb. 15 at 6 p.m.(Susan Zawalich)
A sublimely romantic movie, set in Scotland during wartime (WWII). Wendy Hiller plays a decidedly decided young woman, setting off to marry a rich man who is temporarily leasing an island in the Western Isles.  But nature (in the form of weather and a handsome young officer) intervenes.  88 min.

Stormy Weather (1943)Fri. Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. (Susan Zawalich)
This studio musical provides a rare opportunity to enjoy the remarkable talents of some of the great African American entertainers of the 1940s. Performers include the great Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, Lena Horne, the Nicholas Brothers, Cab Calloway, Fats Waller, and Dooley Wilson.  How can you resist a song entitled, “I Lost My Sugar in Salt Lake City”? 78 min.

Perth (2004), Thurs. Feb. 21 at 8 p.m. (Adrian Kwek)
A part-time security guard and taxi driver looking to leave the hypocrisy of the modern world behind finds that peace doesn't come as easily as he suspected in Singapore-born director Djinn's award-winning drama. Harry Lee has grown tired with the slick, status-driven society that dominates his homeland, and has chose to seek out his own personal paradise in the Western Australian city of Perth. But solving ones problems isn't always as easy as simply running away, and when Harry finds his attempt to migrate becoming increasingly complicated, he accepts a job ferrying prostitutes. Upon growing infatuated with one particularly tragic Vietnamese prostitute, Harry is suddenly awakened to the darkness that surrounds him and determines to embark on a dangerous quest to seek redemption as his situation grows increasingly unstable. 106 min.

L’aile ou la cuisse (1976), Fri. Feb. 22 at 6 p.m. (Jean-François Charles) 
You liked Ratatouille? Come for more great movies about food. And not just any food! In L'aile ou la Cuisse, you will watch the adventures of Charles Duchemin, a well-known gourmet and publisher of the famous restaurant guide Guide Michelin waging a war against a fast food entrepreneur to save the French art of cooking. This 1976 comedy features two major French personages: Louis de Funès and Coluche. Shown in French only, no subtitled edition is available! 104 min.

Soylent Green (1973), Fri., Feb. 22 at 8 p.m. (Jean-François Charles)       
You will have another look at food in 2022 with a great science fiction movie: Soylent Green, from 1973. Natural food like fruits, vegetables, and meat among others are now extinct. Earth is overpopulated and New York City has 40 million starving, poverty stricken people. The only way they survive is with water rations and eating Soylent. A detective investigates the murder of the president of the Soylent company.  97 min.

The Never-Ending Story (1984), Mon. Feb. 25 at 7 p.m. (Jonathan Schneiderman)
A young boy, tormented by bullies, “escapes” into an ancient story book and becomes involved in adventures in a mythical land.  A German film with English subtitles, directed by Wolfgang Petersen.  94 min.

My Fellow Americans (1996)Tues., Feb. 26 at 7:30 p.m. (Rachel Pepper)
Get in the political spirit this February with this comedy about life, liberty and the pursuit of two ex-presidents.  101 min.

Dirty Dancing (1987), Friday, Feb. 29 at 9 p.m. (Di Yin Lu)
As with Grease (1978) and Footloose (1984) before it, Dirty Dancing was a cultural phenomenon that now plays more like camp. That very campiness, though, is part of its biggest charm. And if the dancing in the movie doesn't seem particularly "dirty" by today's standards--or 1987's--it does take place in an era (the early '60s) when it would have. Frances "Baby" Houseman (Jennifer Grey, daughter of ageless hoofer Joel Grey) has been vacationing in the Catskills with her family for many years. Uneventfully. One summer, she falls under the sway (as it were) of dance instructor Johnny Castle (Patrick Swayze). Baby is a pampered pup, but Johnny is a man of the world. Baby's father, Jake (Law and Order's Jerry Orbach), can't see the basic decency in greaser Johnny that she can. It should come as no surprise to find that Baby, who can be as immature as her name, learns more about love and life--and dancing--from free-spirited Johnny than traditionalist Jake. 100 min.

An Evening with Bette Davis, Friday, March 7, in the Graduate Student Lounge

Help us celebrate the fact that 2008 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the great actress (and Massachusetts native!) Bette Davis by joining us at Dudley House in the Graduate Student Lounge this Friday, March 7, for a screening of two of her greatest films

At 6 p.m. Now, Voyager (1942). Bette plays a repressed Boston spinster tyrannied by her formidable mother in a decorous brownstone on Marlborough Street. An iminent nervous breakdown sends her to a doctor who helps her to find her own identity (and so does a shipboard romance with Paul Henreid!) One of the most influential "women's pictures" of the 1940s.

At 8 p.m. All About Eve (1950). Bette plays Margo Channing, a tempestuous stage actress who is anxious about the effect her age might begin to have on her career. One evening an eager young fan (Ann Baxter) appears backstage...all she wants to do is to be of service to her idol....but more complications ensue! A superb cast includes George Sanders as Addison De Witt, the acerbic critic, Thelma Ritter, Celeste Holm, and an impressive cameo appearance by Marilyn Monroe. One of the wittiest backstage stories ever produced, a true classic.

Easter Parade, Monday, March 24, 6 p.m. in the Graduate Student Lounge

Celebrate Easter Monday with us by watching the wonderful classic MGM musical, Easter Parade (1948) starring Judy Garland and Fred Astaire. Set in the New York of 1912, this musical contains so many wonderful numbers. Music by Irving Berlin. Singing, dancing, comedy, romance provided by two of the greatest performers of the twentieth century, Garland and Astaire. A wonderful way to celebrate the arrival of spring.

The Red Shoes (1948). Friday, April 11 at 6 p.m. in the Graduate Student Lounge

This is the technicolor classic film starring some of the greatest ballet artists of the 20th century. Using a famous story by Hans Christian Andersen as a basis, the plot revolves around a talented ballerina who is ultimately forced to choose between her marriage to a young composer and her art as a dancer. Her star vehicle is the ballet "The Red Shoes"... a girl puts on the red shoes and literally dances herself to death. An extremely beautiful and intense film about the difficulties of being an artist in a secular culture.

Dudley House Classic Movies 2006-2007

“There is really no such things as an “old” movie – just wonderful pictures you may not have discovered yet.” -- Peter Bogdanovich

There will be several different film series offered at Dudley this year. Our classic film series this term begins with one of the greatest films ever made (by common acclaim)…followed by a series of family-friendly classics and other surprises. We look forward to sharing our favorite films with you at Dudley House. Contact Susan Zawalich (zawalich@fas.harvard.edu). If you are interested in the Documentary Film series shown on Tuesdays, check out the Arts Fellows site or contact Jie Li (jieli@fas.harvard.edu).

Films on Friday evenings on the big-screen TV in the Graduate Student Lounge:

September 22 –Who Was Charles Foster Kane? Does Anyone Know?
6 p.m. Citizen Kane (1941), Orson Welles' masterpiece, is a stunning exploration of the life of an American tycoon (modeled on William Randolph Hearst, among others). If you have never managed to see this famous film or if you would like to revisit it with a congenial group, here's your chance! You'll be murmuring “Rosebud!” when you leave, that's guaranteed. (120 min.)

September 29 – Family Classics Celebrate True Love
6 p.m. Lady and the Tramp (1955). An elegant cocker spaniel meets a scruffy mutt from the wrong side of the tracks…true love ensues. A truly charming Walt Disney animated classic. (80 min.)

7:30 p.m. The Princess Bride (1987). Inconceivable! As You Wish! My name is Inigo Montoya…yes, all the classic lines, a visit to the fire swamp, screaming eels, dastardly villains, and (sigh) Dread Pirate Roberts and Buttercup…what a great movie! (98 min.)

October 13 – An American Classic Western
6 p.m. The Searchers (1956). John Ford directed this famous movie, one of several films he made with John Wayne, the iconic Western hero. Wayne gives an astounding performance as a bitter Civil War soldier who loses his family in an Indian raid… his niece survives but is captured by Indians…he spends the next 10 years searching for her and his own identity. One of the most beautifully filmed of all Western classics and a movie that was extremely important to 70s filmmakers (Scorcese, Spielberg, et. al.) Controversial and powerful. (120 min.)

October 27 – Sci-Fi Classics of the 1950s
6 p.m. The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957). A strange cloud of radiation has a very strange effect on an unfortunate American…he gets smaller and smaller … but other things get bigger and bigger…it does wonders for his perspective. A really great film (81 min.)

7:30 p.m. The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). Klaatu birada nicto. A strange visitor from another planet arrives in our nation's capital…accompanied by a menacing robot and an important message for humanity. Robert Wise directed (earlier he had edited Citizen Kane , later he directed The Sound of Music …quite a range!) (92 min.)

November 3 – New Wave French Classics, directed by François Truffaut
6 p.m. Shoot the Piano Player Tirez sur le pianiste ) (1960). Charles Aznavour stars in Truffaut's second film, a study of an alienated musician with a gangster family and a lot of personal complications. A genre-bending classic, much beloved by Truffaut fans (92 min)

8 p.m. Jules and Jim (1962). The notorious ménage a trois film classic… two life-long friends fall in love with the same intriguing woman. How will it all end? Jeanne Moreau became an international star with this movie. (100 min.)

December 8 – 6 p.m. Annual Holiday Classic: The Sound of Music

Crisp apple strudel, Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp, nuns, nazis, alps, a scheming baroness…and all those children! Irresistible for so many of us…we can't help it. Great fun for everyone!